Juraj Jánošík: An Outlaw Who Became the Slovak National Hero

Jánošík, a young outlaw with braided hair, carrying a shepherd’s axe called valaška, and wearing rural clothing, is the unlikely hero of Slovakia who is also popular in Poland and the Czech Republic. Throughout the last three hundred years, he has remained to be the symbol of the fight for freedom, and he continues to inspire people to create more, fight for justice, and not to lose hope in the face of adversity.

The Top 5 Magical Women of Arthurian Legend

A brilliant professor once told us that desire always lurks at the heart of Arthurian legends. Desire for glory, for love, for kingdoms, for power over one’s own life. While the desires of Arthurian women often led to unflattering depictions (depictions that Feminist retellings of the legends strive to rehabilitate or explain with a backstory), they also make them some of the legends’ most compelling characters. This is particularly true when magic is involved! With this in mind, today we offer a discussion of our top five most magical women of Arthuriana.

Castles That Go Bump in the Night

From Macbeth’s castle in the Scottish Highlands to the shores of Hampshire, Britain has many haunted castles that go bump in the night. Sad stories, gripping tales, injustices, battles and sieges, kings and queens, all spanning two thousand years of history.

Racism & Folklore: Meet Saci-Pererê, The Brazilian Folklore Superstar

We’ve got many different characters in Brazilian Folkcloric scene and they are related to all aspects of the land, weather, traditions and beliefs. Due to the territorial size of Brazil, some characters and legends are exclusive in some areas, while others change in order to adapt to different locations. However, there is one single name which is known all over the country and that fascinates – and sometimes scares – everyone, from children to adults. He is Saci-Pererê, the Brazilian folklore superstar.

A Year and a Day – My Top 5 Characters from the Mabinogion

The Mabinogion is a mess of misconstrued mythology, a minefield of mistranslation and misinterpretations. It’s also the font of all fantasy, a literary sub-genre that did not have any following before Lady Charlotte Guest presented her loose translation, first published in seven volumes between 1838 and 1845. Much effort was put into making them read as a cohesive, integrated story, which they were not. They were compiled from many traditional tales told in the Welsh language dating right back to the earliest bardic tradition and originate in an ancient culture that spanned pre-Roman Briton and Eire.

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