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Remy Dean was born in Newport, Gwent, 1965, and now lives with his wife, daughter and dog in Snowdonia. He is an artist and author of more than ten published books and more than fifty features in national newspapers and magazines. He is also a story-teller, lecturer on art and folklore, and hosts creative workshops. Non-fiction books by Dean include biographies and critiques of Nick Cave, Henry Rollins, Nine Inch Nails, Nirvana, Suede, Lydia Lunch, Celine Dion(!) and more recently the web-active history of art textbook, Evolution of Western Art. His works of fiction for grown-ups include Scraps, a novel, Final Bough, a tale of the supernatural, and the recent short story collection, The Race Glass. His latest novel, This, is an epic fairy-tale-fantasy inspired by local folklore and, written with his young daughter as creative consultant, is his first book for children and young adults. This (part one) is available now, via Amazon. For more information, go to Remy’s own weblog: www.remydean.blogspot.co.uk, or for regular updates, follow Remy Dean on twitter: @DeanAuthor.

Remy Dean explores the stories of Wild Kynaston; a medieval noble turned highwayman who may have inspired some of the

It seems fairly logical to begin our search for the real Dick Whittington at Whittington Castle in Shropshire, which local

A lot of folklore is concerned with other realms. Worlds that exist apart, yet overlap or interact to varying degrees.

Derwen Ceubren yr Ellyll, which means “The Hollow Oak, Haunt of Demons” or “The Blasted Oak of Spirits” was a

There was once a bright-white cow which travelled round the world, giving milk enough for all comers. Whoever drank of

Iron bands around coffin of a witch were believed to prevent them from escaping their tombs. Yet iron has also

The folklore of iron and smithing has been common since prehistory, and one of the oldest folktales tells of a

Huw Llwyd, the Welsh wizard, has been immortalised in the folklore and fairy tales of Wales, his fantastic exploits told

The tales surrounding this, rather unassuming, standing-stone are taller than the stone itself.

These cicorc (or cork-dogs) were seen as good luck charms and also gave the sailors something else to think about