Racism & Folklore: Meet Saci-Pererê, The Brazilian Folklore Superstar

We’ve got many different characters in Brazilian Folkcloric scene and they are related to all aspects of the land, weather, traditions and beliefs. Due to the territorial size of Brazil, some characters and legends are exclusive in some areas, while others change in order to adapt to different locations. However, there is one single name which is known all over the country and that fascinates – and sometimes scares – everyone, from children to adults. He is Saci-Pererê, the Brazilian folklore superstar.

Hunting for Unicorns

Scotland is one of the few nations to have chosen a mythological creature rather than a real one as her national animal, and probably the only nation to have chosen an animal that no one believed actually lived there…

Top 5 Mothers in Brazilian Folklore, Mythology and Beliefs

Mother goddesses are present in all kinds of mythology around the world. They all bring the archetypical mother qualities: giving birth, nurturing, taking care, and teaching their offspring, for example. In Brazil, we have the influence of three big –- and totally different –- cultures that shaped customs and beliefs we have today.

Wolf Myths and Folklore From Around the World

The most famous wolf myth is the one of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. The story has evolved through the ages, but the best-known version claims their mother was a virgin and that their father was the war god Mars. In typical Greek-Roman fashion, their great uncle – the king – abandoned them on the River Tiber in an attempt to avoid a prophecy of his death. Tiberinus, the god of the river, spared the twins. A wolf suckled the boys until a shepherd adopted them. Eventually, Romulus and Remus helped their grandfather retake his thrown and kill their great uncle.

Was it Really East of the Sun and West of the Moon?

The Norwegian folktale, “East of the Sun and West of the Moon,” in which a white bear comes to take a poor girl away, is loved by people the world over. It is also part of a huge cycle of folklore and myth that has spanned Eurasia in the last 2500 years.

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