Albion’s Glorious Ile: William Hole and the Strangest Maps of Britain Ever Made

In the early 17th century, the celebrated London engraver William Hole created some of the strangest maps of Britain ever commissioned to illustrate Poly-Olbion, a vast 15,000-line topographical poem by Michael Dayton (1563-1631).

Werewolves that Fish and Fight in Battles: The Scottish Wulver and Irish Faoladh in Folklore

Werewolves. The name alone conjures up nightmarish images from our current pop culture horror films starring this shapeshifting man-wolf.

Ancient Celtic Cauldrons: The Magical, the Mythical, the Real

For the Celts, cauldrons had many everyday uses. As well as cooking, boiling, cleaning, bathing, carrying water and other domestic tasks they also had a special place in their religious rites and mythology. As a cauldron was a container for water, the ocean and possibly some lakes were thought of as great cauldrons. Sometimes cauldrons were left as votive offerings to the gods in bogs, rivers, and pools.

The Six Creepiest Creatures from Scottish Folklore

Scottish lore contains some of the darkest and strangest figures in folkloric history: shape-shifters, blood-suckers, monsters without skin.

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close