The Significance of the New Year in Folklore

New Year’s festivity dates back some 4,000 years to ancient Babylon, connecting religion and mythology. In ancient Babylon, the new moon following the vernal equinox, when, in late, March an equal amount of sunlight and darkness are present, marked the New Year. The vernal equinox represented the rebirth of the natural world.

Mead: Customs and Traditions

Historically, distilling was an art, as well as an arcane type of magic, regulated by custom, law, and superstition. Certain individuals were trained in this magic of turning honey into mead, a powerful conjuring that mystified the ignorant. The process by which the juice of the grape, the toil of the bee, or the grain of the field, were turned into mind altering substances was not well understood…

English Folklore: What Cultural Values Does It Represent?

In broad terms, folklore—or rather its constituents—comprise legends, music, oral history, proverbs, jokes, popular beliefs, fairy tales, stories, tall tales, and customs that are the traditions of a culture. Folklore is a vital feature of our lives.

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